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Mobile Personal Training

We want to make you as fit and healthy as we can so you start to feel more productive, more efficient and more energetic. The way we do that is by taking a holistic approach to health fitness that takes into account the mind, the body, exercise and nutrition.

The company has experts in medicine, nutrition and physiotherapy and we are combining years of experience to deliver a holistic approach to health and wellbeing.

At our free trial we do some strength and flexibility testing as well as a postural and nutrition analysis to give us a base to work from. At its completion you will receive a personalised program that is accessed through the Tier 1 app that covers strength, mobility and endurance.

If you like what you see and want to make a long-term commitment we will collaborate with you to create an eight-week program that meets your goals and desires but is still enjoyable and fun at the same time.

SESSION

  • Baseline testing of strength and mobility
  • Postural assessment
  • Nutritional assessment

PROGRAM
Receive three individualised programs accessed through the Tier 1 app.

  • Strength
  • Mobility
  • Endurance

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Program Landing Page

Mobile Personal Training

We know you lead a busy life and don’t have time to waste – That’s why we work around you. Tell us when and where and we make it work. Tier 1’s mobile personal training service provides quick and efficient fitness solutions to people of all ages and all levels.

It’s fitness on the go for people who strive to be more productive and more efficient. We complete a fitness assessment; do some strength and flexibility testing as well as movement and postural analysis to give us a base to work from.

Once you decide to make a long-term commitment we will collaborate with you to create an eight-week program that meets your goals and desires but is still enjoyable and fun at the same time. This is a great way to improve your fitness through some structured mobile personal training.

SESSION 1
Goal Setting Baseline testing (BMI, upper and lower body strength, core strength) – Strength Session – repetition based workout on primal movement patterns

SESSION 2
Injury history, strength and flexibility testing – Muscular endurance workout

SESSION 3
Postural Assessment – Boxing fundamentals or Mobility and rehab – learn boxing technique or how to improve mobility and flexibility

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Home Programs

Have fun and lose weight

The goal of this program is to have fun and lose weight. We want you to see real results. Let us create a structured workout guide to help you reach your goal and craft a perfect body plan that you can start implementing straight away. We want to help you lose weight but we also want to make this as enjoyable as we can.

In the first three sessions we give you an overview of the program. We listen to your input and take on any suggestions as to how we can optimise your experience as a client. We complete a fitness assessment and then do some strength and flexibility testing to give us a base to work from.

Once you decide to make a long-term commitment we will collaborate with you to create an eight-week program that meets your goals and desires but still enables you to have fun and lose weight.

SESSION 1
Goal Setting Baseline testing (BMI, upper and lower body strength, core strength). Strength Session – repetition based workout on primal movement patterns

SESSION 2
Injury history, strength and flexibility testing – Muscular endurance workout

SESSION 3
Postural Assessment – Boxing fundamentals or Mobility and rehab – learn boxing technique or how to improve mobility and flexibility

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Home Programs

Start your fitness journey

Start your fitness journey with Tier 1 and get the best advice possible. Tier 1 leaves no stone unturned in our desire to see our clients reach their full potential.

We offer comprehensive fitness solutions to high achievers looking to crystallise their untapped potential. This is a total health makeover to make you more productive, more efficient and more energetic.

You will come out of this with a spring in your step. In the first three sessions we give you an overview of the program and listen to your input as to how we can optimise your experience as a client. We complete a fitness assessment and then do some strength and flexibility testing to give us a base to work from.

Once you decide to make a long-term commitment we will collaborate with you to create an eight-week program that meets your goals and desires but is still enjoyable and fun at the same time.

SESSION 1
Goal Setting Baseline testing (BMI, upper and lower body strength, core strength). Strength Session – repetition based workout on primal movement patterns

SESSION 2
Injury history, strength and flexibility testing – Muscular endurance workout

SESSION 3
Postural Assessment – Boxing fundamentals or Mobility and rehab – learn boxing technique or how to improve mobility and flexibility

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About Us Trainers

ALEX

Alex specialises in pre and post natal fitness and has been training pregnant and post partum women for many years. She believes exercise should be fun and works closely to ensure that her training is not only beneficial but also sustainable over the long term.

Alex is an accredited exercise physiologist with over 10 years experience. Her extensive experience includes training over 55’s and individuals with chronic health conditions including heart disease and mental illness. She wants to pass on skills that create a healthier lifestyle over a lifetime.

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Resources

Why fish is good for the heart and arthritis

fish is good for the heart and arthritis

. Packed with nutrients

. Experts recommend eating fish two to three times a week

. Limit eating fish that is high in Mercury such as swordfish and marlin

Fish has long been considered good for both the heart and the brain but is also valuable in the fight against arthritis. It’s high protein and packed with nutrients such as Vitamin D, B2 and Omega 3 fatty acids. Dieticians and nutritionists recommend eating fish two to three times a week as does the Australian heart foundation.

Studies have shown that it provides benefits in the fight against Alzheimer’s Disease and depression as well as helping to lower cholesterol. It should also be part of your armoury in the battle against arthritis. Today we look at how it can be beneficial to both your heart and joints.

But the first thing to note is that there is a sliding scale in terms of which fish provide the most nutritional value. There are certain fish that are best to avoid. As a general rule, try and steer clear of fish that are heavy in mercury such as shark, swordfish and marlin. Mercury is a metallic substance that often attaches itself to fish and can cause long term health issues down the road.

What the experts recommend

Fish that are high in Omega 3 fatty acids are the choice of the experts. These include Salmon, Mackerel and Herring. If you actively look to incorporate these types of fish into your diet you are on the right path. They are rich in calcium and protein and help to lower blood pressure.

The Australian Heart Foundation ‘recommends all Australians should aim to include 2–3 serves of fish per week as part of a heart-healthy diet. They go on to say ‘Because our bodies cannot produce omega-3s we need to source them through our diet.

The scientific evidence supports fish as the best dietary source of omega3s and found higher fish intake was consistently associated with lower rates of heart disease (heart failure and sudden cardiac death) and stroke.’

However, this study suggests that different types of fish provide different value: ‘Modest consumption of tuna or other broiled or baked fish, but not fried fish or fish sandwiches, is associated with lower risk of IHD death…..Cardiac benefits of fish consumption may vary depending on the type of fish meal consumed.’

Anti-inflammatory effect

The secondary benefit obviously relates to the issue of arthritis and how to best manage the ailment. As this study states: ‘Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to reduce morning stiffness, the number of tender joints and swollen joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.’

But it takes time before you see the full benefits of the program. They say: ‘In our study, a significant improvement was seen at the end of the twelfth week in 7 clinical variables.’

The Arthritis Foundation states:

‘Research finds that people who regularly eat fish high in omega-3s are less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA). And in those who already have the disease, marine omega-3s may help reduce joint swelling and pain. 

The anti-inflammatory effects from omega-3s are helpful not just for relieving arthritis, but also for preventing other diseases linked to inflammation, such as heart disease.’

Correlation between heart health and arthritis

And that’s an important point to note that these two ailments often go together. Your heart relies on exercise and blood circulation but arthritis often prevents people from engaging in any form of physical activity because of the pain and discomfort involved.

So you have to look at the big picture. Exercise is important, as is diet, but they often go together. If you can get your diet right that could lead to becoming more mobile down the road and eating fish regularly is certainly a great start because it’s highly beneficial to both the heart and joints.

References

The Heart Foundation

https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/getmedia/4adbe011-db9a-4777-8a99-db6365e27cb1/Consumer_QA_Fish_Omega3_Cardiovascular_Health.pdf

NCBI: Cardiac benefits of fish consumption may depend on the type of fish and meal consumed: the cardiovascular health study

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12642356/

NCBI: The effect of Omega 3 fatty acids in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis receiving DMARD’s therapy: Double blind randomized control trial

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965662/

Arthritis Foundation

https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/best-fish-for-arthritis

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Resources

Berries are all purpose and particularly good for arthritis

berries are good for arthritis

. High in antioxidants

. Significant anti-inflammatory effect

. Help to reduce pain associated with arthritis

Diet can impact your management of arthritis and one of the best food groups in that regard is fruit and vegetables. Berries in particular are considered to be of great benefit and we will look at the therapeutic and nutritional value of berries, strawberries and blueberries.

The Arthritis foundation states that ‘Berries top the charts in antioxidant power, protecting your body against inflammation and free radicals, molecules that can damage cells and organs.’

And according to this study:

‘Dietary fruits, especially berries are a rich source of several phytochemicals and nutrients which may explain much of their physiological effects as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. Commonly consumed berries, such as blueberries, raspberries and strawberries are a rich source of several polyphenols.’

Berries are quite often found in plant based foods, so any diet that is rich in fruit and vegetables is a great start. What antioxidants do is essentially protect and repair cell damage and arthritis is essentially the wearing away of ageing joints so it’s a perfect match.

As stated here, berries bring with them a potent anti-inflammatory element: ‘Fruits, such as berries and pomegranates are rich sources of a variety of dietary bioactive compounds, especially the polyphenolic flavonoids that have been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.’

Berries help to manage pain and discomfort

One of the issues with arthritis is the pain and discomfort that comes with it. Staying active and losing weight, which releases stress on your knees and joints, is an excellent remedy but food also plays a part. This study suggests that the compounds found in strawberries are a useful weapon in alleviating some of the pain that comes with knee arthritis.

‘Given the economic burden of obesity and related conditions, including knee OA, our study suggests that simple dietary intervention, i.e., the addition of berries, may have a significant impact on pain, inflammation, and overall quality of life in obese adults with OA.’

The following study also suggests that blueberries have significant anti-inflammatory effect:

‘Dietary polyphenols have been studied for their anti-inflammatory properties and potential anabolic effects on the cartilage cells. Blueberries are widely consumed and are high in dietary polyphenols, therefore regular consumption of blueberries may help improve OA.’

It goes on to say that ‘blueberries, raspberries and strawberries, as well as pomegranates are among the commonly available fruits that may offer some protection against arthritis.’

In conclusion, all forms of berries have the potential to be a potent weapon in the fight against arthritis. The great thing is they provide other benefits as well so you should certainly look to incorporate them into your diet regardless of age. In addition to being anti-inflammatory they are high in fiber, can help balance blood sugar levels and lower cholesterol, which makes them a valuable and all-purpose type of nutrient.

References

NCBI: Dietary fruits and arthritis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788027/

Arthritis Foundation

http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/tag/health-benefits-of-berries/

NCBI: Strawberries improve pain and inflammation in obese adults with radiographic evidence of knee ostheoarthritis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5622709/

NCBI: Blueberries improve pain, gait performance and inflammation in individuals with symptomatic knee ostheoarthritis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413191/

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Resources

Arthritis and the Mediterranean diet

Arthritis and the Mediterranean diet

. Some elements of the Mediterranean diet are useful in the fight against arthritis

. Fish, grains and berries are foods you should look to incorporate into your diet

. Use discretion in regards to alcohol when trying to manage arthritis

When constructing a diet to reduce the symptoms of arthritis there are certain foods you can incorporate.  These include fish, grain and berries amongst others. They provide value because they are good at reducing inflammation which is one of the keys to managing arthritis. Foods you should look to avoid are fats, sugar and salt. It’s a matter of common sense but you should avoid foods that inflame the condition and eat foods that improve the condition.

This health study goes on to say that ‘Twenty-four percent of subjects reported that foods affect their RA, with 15% reporting improvement and 19% worsening. Blueberries and spinach were the foods most often reported to improve RA symptoms, while soda with sugar and desserts were most often reported to worsen RA symptoms.’

Is the Mediterranean diet helpful?

Over the years some have advocated the virtues of the Mediterranean diet which embodies a more traditional way of living. Excess sugar is avoided, meat is eaten sparingly and the focus is food sourced from the earth. The emphasis is on plant foods, fruit and vegetables, fish and seafood, all of which can provide value. For flavour, meals are cooked in olive oil and topped up with red wine.

Advocates of the Mediterranean diet love the freshness and vibrancy of the food but in terms of reducing arthritis the medical information is varied. This journal looked at four studies that had incorporated Mediterranean elements and found that ‘Only one study reported a reduction in the 28 joint count disease activity score for rheumatoid arthritis.

This review has identified beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet in reducing pain and increasing physical function in people living with rheumatoid arthritis. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to support widespread recommendation of the Mediterranean diet for prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.’

In regards to olive oil this study suggests it has a positive impact. It says that ‘Studies have also shown that incorporation of olive oil in diet decreases the risk of developing RA.’  

What about wine?

Wine is a staple in that part of the world but what is its effect on arthritis? The studies are varied but it’s generally accepted that excessive alcohol can be detrimental to those already suffering from the ailment. It can potentially inflame the condition.

But if you drink in moderation, it might not be all bad. You have to find the right balance. In regards to red wine there might be some good news. According to the Arthritis foundation: ‘Red wine has a compound in it called resveratrol, which has well-established anti-inflammatory effects. Some studies show wine consumption is associated with a reduced risk of knee OA, and moderate drinking is also associated with a reduced risk of RA.’

But it does also state that ‘many experts question the strength of these studies.’ However, other studies have drawn similar conclusions. This study states that ‘intra-articular injection of resveratrol may protect cartilage against the development of experimentally induced IA.’  

Look at all options

There is certainly a mixed bag in regards to the scientific backing of the virtues of red wine, but if you are going to incorporate it into your diet perhaps it’s best to tread lightly and do so gently and moderately.

When looking a the big picture, The Mediterranean diet certainly has some elements to it that make it an attractive option. You can certainly source specific nutrients that have proven therapeutic value. But you still have to research thoroughly, consult with your doctor and consider all the other options at your disposal as well.

References

NCBI

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5563270/

NCBI

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29256100/#:~:text=Only%20one%20study%20reported%20a,people%20living%20with%20rheumatoid%20arthritis.

NCBI

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5682732/

Arthritis Foundation

https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/best-drinks-for-arthritis#:~:text=Red%20wine%20has%20a%20compound,a%20reduced%20risk%20of%20RA.

NCBI

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17115116/

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What does your heart rate mean?

A woman checking her heart rate

. Your target heart rate is between 50 and 85 percent of your maximum heart rate

. Listen to your body and understand the signs

. A lower resting heart rate is optimal because it means your heart is highly efficient

Today we talk about heart rate and the things you should be mindful of when exercising. To calculate your maximum heart rate the most basic rule is to subtract your age from 220. For most people the target heart rate is considered to be somewhere between 50 and 85 percent of their maximum heart rate. While experts differ on whether people should obsess over this, the best approach seems to be to use it as a guide. If you’re falling under that 50 per cent threshold, it could be interpreted as a sign that maybe you can afford to work a bit harder, but within reason.

The most important thing is to know your own body. You have to listen to the signs and understand what you’re capable of. Things of this nature are a guide to help you in the right direction. The more informed you are and the more knowledge you have the better off you will be. Your resting heart rate is one of the benchmarks that medical experts will use to determine your overall health. What this is really judging is efficiency and functionality by assessing how hard your heart has to work on a day to day basis.

Lower is better

With that in mind, a lower resting heart rate is optimal because it means your heart is so efficient it doesn’t need to work as hard to do its job properly. Everything is in good order. For adults, between 60 and 80 beats per minute is considered optimal any anything above 90 is usually considered a little high.

A high resting heart rate is considered dangerous because it’s interpreted as a predictor of cardiovascular disease down the road. It’s important to address the issue early and rectify it while you’re healthy enough to do so. The way to do that is through diet, exercise and lifestyle.

This study looked at the correlation between resting heart rate and the overall fitness of Brazilian adolescents. It first defines the meaning behind the numbers:

‘Heart rate reflects the number of contractions of the ventricles per unit time and fluctuates substantially with variations in systemic demand for oxygen.’ What this basically means is that the heart has to work harder when it’s not getting the appropriate supply of oxygen. The findings indicate that aerobic exercise is beneficial to your overall health. They also underline why it’s important to get into good exercise habits at a young age and maintain them right throughout your life.

Above 90

But what if you start entering that danger zone above 90 beats per minute. This study interprets the data as such:

‘Results from this meta-analysis suggest the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality increased by 9% and 8% for every 10 beats/min increment of resting heart rate….but a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular mortality was observed at 90 beats/min.’

So again, when you approach that 90 beats per minute threshold you’re entering dangerous territory and it’s important to activate lifestyle choices for your own health and wellbeing. You need to make some serious life decisions before it’s too late.

It’s important for people of all ages to monitor their heart rate and take the data seriously. But the good news is that through diet and exercise you can rectify any underlying issues and preserve your long term health provided that you fully commit to the correct course of action.

References

NCBI: Association between Resting Heart Rate and Health-Related Physical Fitness in Brazilian Adolescents

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6046174/

NCBI: Resting heart rate and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the general population: a meta-analysis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4754196/